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    Tsunami 21999-1031 - Dust Collectors Dust Collector Dryer - Two Tower with 60 Gallon Tank

    Manufacturer: Tsunami
    Dust Collectors
    SKU: 21999-1031
    Availability: In stock
    $5,534.72
    i h
    Delivery date: 1-2 days

    REDUCE ENERGY AND SAVE MONEY WITH A DUST COLLECTOR DRYER

    Tsunami’s world-class drying technology is configured specifically for dust collectors to offer a clean air package designed to maximize system performance and reduce operating costs like nothing before.

    WHY DRY AIR MATTERS IN DUST COLLECTORS

    It's obvious that dust collector systems play a critical role in maintaining air quality cleanliness for manufacturers. For years, plant operators have sought for any advantage to improve pulse jet cleaning in bags (sock) or reverse flow cartridge systems. The challenge faced in every dust collector application is to maximize pulse effectiveness and extend bag life while minimizing compressed air consumption. The dust collector system is optimal when the pulses effectively remove cake from the filter, returning the filter effectiveness to the point where the filter meets or exceeds the manufacturer's specification. In order to effectively remove cake, the air needs to be completely free of moisture and contaminants.

    DUST COLLECTOR BEST PRACTICES

    Shown in the graphics are two plumbing setups often found in facilities using dust collector systems. Setup 1 shows a regulator being used as the sole component of the system. With this setup, we often find the regulator set to the highest pressure possible because the small diameter piping (example: 1" dia) creates very high pressure drops when the valves are pulsed. Not only does this affect the efficiency of the pulse or shock wave to the collector bags or cartridges, it also causes pressure drops in the surrounding air system. This can cause further issues and reduce production on air operated equipment nearby. Without proper filtration, water, oil, and sometimes heavy fog coat the filter bags or cartridges, reducing effectiveness and shortening the bag life. Wet and oily bags will need to be pulsed more often, requiring more compressed air.

    Setup 2 is a good minimum requirement to solve some problems in typical systems. Shown in the graphic are larger pipes and a filters going through a restrictor valve to limit the speed of air being replenished in the tank before the next cycle. A storage tank should be provided to allow enough cushion for pulse valves to cycle with minimum pressure drop. This will allow for a more powerful, consistent shock wave to increase efficiency. With the additional storage of air in the tank, an air regulator can be set at lower pressure downstream to reduce amount of air used per pulse. This system will still have oils and fog due to supercooling that coats the bags or cartridges which reduce efficiency and shorten life.

    Products specifications
    Product Class Compressed Air
    Product Type Dust Collection
    Component Class Tower

    REDUCE ENERGY AND SAVE MONEY WITH A DUST COLLECTOR DRYER

    Tsunami’s world-class drying technology is configured specifically for dust collectors to offer a clean air package designed to maximize system performance and reduce operating costs like nothing before.

    WHY DRY AIR MATTERS IN DUST COLLECTORS

    It's obvious that dust collector systems play a critical role in maintaining air quality cleanliness for manufacturers. For years, plant operators have sought for any advantage to improve pulse jet cleaning in bags (sock) or reverse flow cartridge systems. The challenge faced in every dust collector application is to maximize pulse effectiveness and extend bag life while minimizing compressed air consumption. The dust collector system is optimal when the pulses effectively remove cake from the filter, returning the filter effectiveness to the point where the filter meets or exceeds the manufacturer's specification. In order to effectively remove cake, the air needs to be completely free of moisture and contaminants.

    DUST COLLECTOR BEST PRACTICES

    Shown in the graphics are two plumbing setups often found in facilities using dust collector systems. Setup 1 shows a regulator being used as the sole component of the system. With this setup, we often find the regulator set to the highest pressure possible because the small diameter piping (example: 1" dia) creates very high pressure drops when the valves are pulsed. Not only does this affect the efficiency of the pulse or shock wave to the collector bags or cartridges, it also causes pressure drops in the surrounding air system. This can cause further issues and reduce production on air operated equipment nearby. Without proper filtration, water, oil, and sometimes heavy fog coat the filter bags or cartridges, reducing effectiveness and shortening the bag life. Wet and oily bags will need to be pulsed more often, requiring more compressed air.

    Setup 2 is a good minimum requirement to solve some problems in typical systems. Shown in the graphic are larger pipes and a filters going through a restrictor valve to limit the speed of air being replenished in the tank before the next cycle. A storage tank should be provided to allow enough cushion for pulse valves to cycle with minimum pressure drop. This will allow for a more powerful, consistent shock wave to increase efficiency. With the additional storage of air in the tank, an air regulator can be set at lower pressure downstream to reduce amount of air used per pulse. This system will still have oils and fog due to supercooling that coats the bags or cartridges which reduce efficiency and shorten life.

    Products specifications
    Product Class Compressed Air
    Product Type Dust Collection
    Component Class Tower